Woman storms ex-husband’s lab to steal brains of people who paid to be resurrected

A woman raided her ex-husband’s cryogenics lab, stealing frozen brains and dead bodies of rich people who had paid to be one day scientifically brought back to life.

Woman storms ex-husband’s lab to steal brains of people who paid to be resurrected
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Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned!

A Russian woman proved this statement true when she raided the cryogenic lab she co-owned with her ex-husband, making away with brains and cadavers of people who had paid to be cryogenically frozen.

Valerie Udalova, 61, stole the frozen brains and dead bodies when she broke into the KriosRus facility.

The Raid

According to her ex-husband, Danila Medvedev, 41, Udalova, working with a team, cut through a metal wall at the storage facility.

Once inside, they drained nitrogen from the fibre glasses in which the remains were kept and loaded the spoil onto trucks.

The vehicles were stopped by the police after staff of the lab noticed the break-in and notified the police.

However, Medvedev told RTVi:

The police did not catch Valeria. She left, taking someone's brain from the cryo-storage. The brains of our neuro-patients were kept separately, in special metal medical boxes.
Udalova and her team loaded the cadavers onto trucks but were later stopped by the police.  East2West

The Feud

Both Medvedev, and its ex-boss and wife Udalova, who started a new company, claim to be the legitimate owners of the human remains.

Police are interrogating these claims while demanding that both parties ensure the integrity of the frozen dead bodies and brains kept in their care.

There are also the remains of cats and dogs whose owners hope to bring them to life sometime in the future.

Udalova insists she is the rightful owner of the company’s assets:

There are a lot of orders from different countries, especially from dog and cat owners. This is the reason why Medvedev wanted to take KrioRus for himself.

The cost of cryopreserving one’s body is around £26,000 while storing just the brain costs some £11,000.

The company has about 82 of such remains in its warehouse, including patients from Britain and the USA.

These people hoped that their brains would be ‘woken’ in decades or centuries to come and could be implanted in other human body.