Incredible: These Are The Most Expensive Video Game Items Ever Sold

Incredible: These Are The Most Expensive Video Game Items Ever Sold

These items – while useless in reality – were sold for tens of thousands of pounds... one even for the price of a home.

1. Counter-Strike: Global Offensive – Karambit Blue Gem Knife: This knife with a rare skin was traded for a whopping £74,000. The marketplace for CS:GO is a strange one, with players even filing lawsuits against Valve for profiting from its “illegal gambling” nature.

2. Dota 2 – Ethereal Flame Pink Enduring War Dog: This rare skin for the mythical courier was purchased by a player that goes by the tag of July.24. Since then, a patch has caused the item to decrease in value by nearly 90%. Ouch.

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3. Team Fortress 2 – Burning Flames Team Captain Hat: A second item from Valve on this list, this time coming in at £12,000. We can see why they’re less concerned with producing new games now when old ones are still creating so much profit.

4. Diablo 3 – Echoing Fury: This legendary mace was sold for a grand total of £10,400. The weapon fetched such a high price as it had near perfect stats and no weapon could match it at the time. Unfortunately for the buyer, new updates brought weapons that were superior.

5. EVE Online – Carrier Ship: One of these vessels went for as high as £8,200. Even more maddening to think that at any point a raid could end up destroying it and effectively flushing your investment down the drain.

6. World of Warcraft – Level 70 Night Elf Rogue with inventory: During the Burning Crusade era, one player bought this character as it was one of the first to hit the level cap and possess incredibly rare and powerful inventory for nearly £5,000. Too bad they were subsequently banned as Blizzard prohibits the sale of its material.

Those who fancy themselves gamers may have noticed one fun fact: all of these games, save EVE Online, are property of Valve and Blizzard. Really makes you think about microtransactions, right?

• Abbie Marshall
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