These Four Unexpected Signs Could Be A Warning You Have Heart Disease
These Four Unexpected Signs Could Be A Warning You Have Heart Disease
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These Four Unexpected Signs Could Be A Warning You Have Heart Disease

Heart disease isn't always easy to diagnose, and often times we don't discover its presence until something serious like a heart attack or stroke occurs. However, there are some tell tale signs you can check for right now with just the help of a mirror. Watch the video and find out more!

Heart disease is a serious concern in the western world, with 1 in 4 people being affected by some form of cardiovascular disease. It goes without saying that the heart is a precious organ and should be treated as such, however sometimes it's difficult to determine how it's doing. 

Fortunately, there are some outward signs that you can check for at home right now without even standing up that could be indicators of potential heart disease.

Grey around the iris

A discoloured, halo-like ring around the iris could mean that there are excess fat deposits sitting in the eye. These rings have been shown to have a link to heart disease and stroke.

Blue lips

If lips are showing a blueish colour, this could be a sign of poor blood flow and pressure. Both of these symptoms could be linked to a weakened or compromised cardiovascular system.

Nail clubbing

Clubbing of the fingernails occurs when the body creates excess tissue to compensate for a lack of oxygenated blood flow to the extremities. Much like blue lips, this could be linked to a weakened cardiovascular system.

Creased earlobes

Creasing of the earlobes is a telltale sign of poor arterial health. Doctors have identified a strong link between creased earlobes and plaque build up in the arteries, which could be an indicator of the disease atherosclerosis. 

To ensure you keep a healthy heart, make sure to eat right and stay active. Make sure to regularly visit your doctor and be sure to bring up any concerns you may have with the state of your heart. For more information of cardiovascular diseases, take a look at what the NHS has to say. 

By Stacey Williams
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