Semen health: Signs you’ve got healthy and strong swimmers

Curious about how healthy your sperm is? Here are three science-backed signs that could tell you if you have strong seeds.

Semen health: Signs you’ve got healthy and strong swimmers
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The best way to find out the strength and potency of your semen is by going to see a specialist who can give you a detailed rundown. However, various studies have been done to find out what other indicators could determine motility and performance. So, if you’ve been wondering about the quality of your swimmers, these scientific signs may give you a clue.

Boxers over briefs

Every individual who has male genitalia has a specific preference when it comes to underwear and there’s certainly a few options to choose from. However, a 2012 study has found that a preference of underwear could reveal much more about the state of your sperm.

According to the British study, men who gravitate towards wearing boxer shorts are 24% less likely to have low-motile sperm count than men who wore tight-fitted underwear. The author of the study, Andrew Povey, explains:

Loose-fitting underwear may result in lower scrotal temperatures compared to tight-fitting underwear, hence an improvement in semen quality.

You’re an average Joe

Now it might sound a little strange, but Spanish and Finnish researchers have uncovered that your level of attractiveness could reveal more about the quality of sperm in your sack.

According to Men’s Health, the researchers found that men who have faces that were wider and broader—which are seen as ‘masculine’ features—often have a poor quality of semen as compared to men who had more slender faces. Jukka Kekäläinen, author of the study, revealed one reason why this could be possible, saying:

If a male consumes more resources on semen production, he may have fewer resources available for developing attractive secondary sexual traits, like facial masculinity.

You don’t have a deep, husky voice

A study conducted in the University of Western Australia discovered that while many heterosexual women considered men who had low-pitched voices more masculine, the same men had higher chances of having lower quantities of sperm in their semen.

Leigh Simmons, the author of the study, says that it could be because of testosterone levels. Their hypothesis is that an abundance of testosterone does result in lower voices but at the same time, it can actually reduce sperm production.