Girl with Tourette syndrome shows what happens when she gets a COVID test in viral TikTok video

Watch as this famous Tik Toker show's the world what it's like to get a COVID test while having Tourette outbursts.

Girl with Tourette syndrome shows what happens when she gets a COVID test in viral TikTok video
Continue reading
Read the article

Zara Beth is a Tik Toker that has amassed more than 1.5 million followers after making videos surrounding the every day life of what it's like to live with Tourette Syndrome.

What it's like to live with Tourettes

With each post on her social media accounts, the teenager sheds light onto what it's like to accomplish everyday taskswhile managing her tics. From going to the optometrist, to attending class or even just being a passenger in a moving car, Zara's intention is to raise awareness and normalise Tourette syndrome as it is estimated to affect about three percent of the world population.

In what could be considered the video that catapulted her into virtual stardom, Zara showcases the intricacies of getting a COVID test while having Tourette spasms and tics. As inadvertently comical as these clip can be, hearing and seeing her curse, flip the bird and sometimes even slap the nurse attempting to jab her, they are also extremely insightful!

@zeezee25

going back to school is going to be tricky with my tics😂 #fyp#foryou#foryoupage#tics#tourettes#ticsawareness#tourettesyndrome#haha#awareness

♬ original sound - Zara Beth 🌙

As you can see in the above video, Zara's body stops at nothing to avoid getting the test. Not because she doesn't want to but because Tourette syndrome has taken control in the form of karate chops, attempts at biting and even some pretty intense cursing.

What is Tourette Syndrome?

Tourette syndrome is a type of disorder that forces people to constantly repeat movements or unwanted sounds (called tics) that are very difficult to manage. Examples of tics include, rapid eye blinking, shrugging shoulders and even making bizarre sounds with one's mouth. In other cases, violent jerks and even uttering offensive words can manifest.

This disorder typically shows up in children between the ages of two and 15 and affects males about four times more often than females. Tourette syndrome has no definitive cure but treatments do exist that can dramatically help reduce unwanted tics. With time, some tics can lessen and in some cases can completely disappear on their own.