'I’m A Celeb' under investigation by rural crime officers

I’m A Celeb 2020 is reportedly being investigated by police over fears that non-native critters being used in the shows Trials could escape into the Welsh countryside and wreak havoc on the eco-system. The show insists that they only use ‘non-invasive species’ and that they are only released in contained areas.

'I’m A Celeb' under investigation by rural crime officers
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I’m A Celeb 2020has been a headache for ITV producers in more ways than one this year–and it looks like they’re facing even more trouble ahead as they are allegedly being investigated by rural crime officers in Wales over complaints that escaped critters used in the Trials could damage local flora and fauna.

I’m A Celeb criticism

Springwatch presenter and Welsh naturalist Iolo Williams slammed the show last week for their use of critters, saying:

I’m not sure which species they’re releasing, but I can tell you they’re not native. We don’t have those cockroaches here in the UK and we certainly don’t have them in north Wales.

In response to the criticism, representative for ITV told the Mirror Online:

All of the insects used on I'm A Celebrity are non-invasive species. They are only ever released in a contained area and collected immediately after filming. The bugs are UK bred and are commercially purchased in the UK for birds and exotic animal feed for pets and zoo keepers in normal circumstances.

Whilst the cockroaches, maggots, worms and spiders that are used in Trials are released in contained areas, celebs who’ve appeared on the show often report getting creepy crawlies stuck up places so it seems likely that some bugs might get missed when collecting them up after the Trials.

RSPCA slams I’m A Celeb 2020

I’m A Celeb 2020has also been criticised by the RSPCA, who have called on the show to ‘put an end to using live creatures for entertainment.’ They said in a statement on their website last week:

We feel that deliberately portraying certain species as nasty, frightening or as objects that can be used purely for entertainment rather than sentient, living creatures sends out totally the wrong message.