Australian woman wakes up to rodent nibbling on her eyeball

Millions of rodents have been turning lives upside down in Australia and while many have been losing crops in their farm, this woman almost lost her eye to a mouse.

Woman wakes up to rodent nibbling on her eyeball
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In early June, an Australian womanwas rushed to the hospital and the reason why will have you baffled. While she was sound asleep, she suddenly got woken up by atiny rodent. No, the rodent wasn’t causing a commotion in her house, it was actually feasting on her eye. And yes, you read that right.

Monstrous mice

A mouse might look rather harmless when it’s all alone, but a group of them can be an unending nightmare, and it's been more than a year since a vast army of rodents have been terrorisingseveral southeastern regions of Australia. These rodents have made life a living hell for residents, by destroying their crops, taking over houses, eating appliances, and they’ve even managed to burn down a home. The situation has been getting out of control, and now the mice have gone as far as to munch on living, breathing human bodies.

The woman, who is the wife of a farmer, was taken to the hospital in New South Wales the same night, and she isn’t the first to wake up to the pitter patter of tiny rodent feet on her face. Mick Harris, a resident of Narromine, told The Times:

I felt a tickly, furry sensation as it crawled from behind my ear across my cheek.
It made my skin crawl. My hair stood up and I jumped out of bed.
For the rest of the night I didn’t sleep a wink — until I caught the mouse in a trap under the bed.

How did it get this bad?

ABC News reports that it was a chain of factors thatled to their emergence. It started in spring 2020, when there was an abundance of crops. At the same time, the drought had killed many predators who prey on mice. So, the mice had plenty of food and faced no predators. Finally, with reproduction taking its course, farmers and citizens were then faced with a sudden surge in rodent numbers which they’re still struggling to keep under control today.