Space: Is An Asteroid Really Going To Crash Into Earth On November 2?
Space: Is An Asteroid Really Going To Crash Into Earth On November 2?
Space: Is An Asteroid Really Going To Crash Into Earth On November 2?
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Space: Is An Asteroid Really Going To Crash Into Earth On November 2?

Ever since NASA announced that an asteroid could be heading towards Earth in early November 2020, people online have been talking about a potential end of the world scenario. However, there is absolutely no reason to panic. Keep reading to find out why.

2020 definitely has had its fair share of unpleasant surprises. NASA has announced that an asteroid could crash into Earth in November. But rest assured, keep reading to find out why you don’t need to panic.

One in… 240!

So yes - there is a chance that an asteroid could crash into Earth on November 2 this year, and this isn’t the first time that an object like this has come so close to our planet. However, this date has become a talking point and is particularly key due to the fact that it just so happens to fall on the eve of the American presidential elections... that is, if they aren’t postponed. Some people even see this as some kind of warning.

But as we’ve already mentioned, the chance that this asteroid, named 2018 VP1, will actually collide with Earth is tiny. According to NASA, there is only a one in 240 chance that this will actually happen. However, this estimate is not exactly precise because, so far, astronomers have not been able to monitor this celestial body for long enough to know its exact trajectory.

Worst-case scenario: destroyed in the atmosphere

If you are still not fully reassured, let’s have a look at the worst-case scenario. The famous ‘one in 240’. Even if the asteroid does get close enough to Earth, there is still no need to panic. According to NASA, the asteroid in question measures about 2 meters by 91 centimetres and weighs barely 15 kilograms.

So judging by its size, weight and shape, if the asteroid does manage to enter our atmosphere, it would quickly disintegrate and wouldn’t cause any damage. Some small pieces could still fall to Earth, but they would not do any damage either. As we've said a couple of times already, there is no danger. Finally, some good news to come out of 2020.

By Daniel Lane
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