Cigarettes And Alcohol: The Dramatic Effects On Life Expectancy Could Be Worse Than Once Thought, Study Suggests

Cigarettes And Alcohol: The Dramatic Effects On Life Expectancy Could Be Worse Than Once Thought, Study Suggests

According to the the most recent study by the WHO on using licit and illicit drugs, tobacco and alcohol could be the substances that pose the biggest threat to our health. The study, led by 17 researchers, has had some alarming results.

Tobacco and alcohol are the most consumed drugs in the world. According to a study led by 17 researchers from different universities, they post a big threat to our health. And the figures speak for themselves.

Worrying results

On their own, alcohol and tobacco use cost humanity 250 million years of life in 2015. Although the study deals with the use of licit and illicit drugs, the drugs at the top of the list that cause the most deaths are tobacco and alcohol.

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The numbers are alarming and are the result of a very important study led by 17 researchers from different universities. In order to evaluate the damage caused by these substances, researchers have collected and analyzed data from 2015 from the World Health Organization (WHO), from the United Nations Office against drugs and crime as well as the Institute for health statistics.

The results were published in the Addiction journal in March last year.

Europe is largely affected

Tobacco and alcohol have stripped people of 250 million years of a healthy life whilst illicit drugs have only taken 30 million. The rate (i.e. number of cases of illness in a given population) of excessive alcohol consumption is the highest with 18.3%, followed by daily tobacco use with 15.2%. Finally, cannabis comes quite far behind with 3.8%, and then amphetamines with 0.77% and 0.37% for cocaine.

The highest rate of tobacco use is recorded in Europe. If you or anyone you know is having a difficult time quitting smoking, the NHS has a wealth of resources available

• Abbie Marshall
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