Eating Just One Egg Per Day Could Have An Amazing Effect On Your Health

Eating Just One Egg Per Day Could Have An Amazing Effect On Your Health

The same food that was once condemned for its cholesterol is taking back its rightful place at the top of the shopping list. According to a recent study, eating an egg a day reduces the risk of cardiac disease.

‘An egg a day keeps the doctor away’ might be the new version of the age-old apple adage. A Sino-British study, published in the journal Heart, reveals a link between egg consumption and cardiovascular health.

An 18% lower risk of dying of heart disease 

Chinese and British researchers analysed data from several Chinese survey centers.  Between 2004 and 2008, they studied 416,213 people between 30 and 79 years old. None of the people studied suffered from cancer, cardiovascular disease, nor diabetes.

They were questioned about their daily egg consumption. 13.1% ate eggs daily (on average 5.3 per week) and 9.1% said they never or rarely ate eggs. 83,977 cases of cardiovascular disease and 9,985 deaths due to cardiovascular disease were observed.

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According to the researchers, these observations established a link between frequent egg consumption and resistance to heart disease. Those who ate eggs daily had an 18% lower risk of dying of heart disease, a 26% lower risk of having a stroke, and a 28% lower risk of dying of a stroke. The researchers also noted in their report that ‘Among Chinese adults, a moderate level of egg consumption, up to less than an egg a day, was significantly associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease.’

The egg redeemed

Even if the link between high egg consumption (more than one egg a day) and risk of cardiovascular disease has yet to be examined, this study at least helped redeem a food that has known more than its fair share of bad press. Egg yolk has been criticized for its high levels of cholesterol, even though ‘dietary cholesterol has very little influence on blood cholesterol levels, which is primarily manufactured by the liver,’ according to Medisite.

Chickens could already take pride in making a food rich in proteins; vitamins A, D, B, and B-12; lutein; and zeaxanthin—now they can boast about battling heart disease, too.

Lily Reeves
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