COVID: Signs you may have caught the virus without knowing

Pink eye and hair loss are some indications that a person might have caught and survived the virus without their knowledge.

COVID: Signs you may have caught the virus without knowing
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After close to two years of the coronavirus pandemic, most people are familiar with the common signs to look out for such as fever, cough, headache, among others. However, health experts say there are signs which indicate a person may have had the virus without knowing it.

Hair loss

Although loss of hair is not on the list of symptoms to look out for, many people who tested positive for COVID have shared their experience with losing and shedding hair.

While these reports are being researched, the American Academy of Dermatology Association said hair shedding—telogen effluvium—could be brought on by a fever.

According to the dermatologists, this happens when more hairs are forced into their shedding phase, which is a natural part of the hair growth life cycle.

Pink eye

Another uncommon indication of the presence of the virus is when one gets a pink eye or conjunctivitis. Developing pink eye or conjunctivitis after having COVID-19 can occur due to how the virus enters your body.

According to Healthline:

COVID-19 is thought to enter your cells through receptors for the enzyme called angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). The virus enters these receptors by tricking your body into thinking it’s the ACE2 enzyme. ACE2 receptors are found in various parts of your eyes, such as your retina and the epithelial cells that line your eye white and eyelid.

Some people with COVID develop other eye symptoms such as dry eye, swelling, excessive tearing and increased eye secretions.

Some 400 million tests have been carried out since the start of the pandemic, but chances are some people may have had the virus and not known about it, according to a government spokesperson.

Thanks to COVID, 2020 has been the worst year for mental health since World War Two Thanks to COVID, 2020 has been the worst year for mental health since World War Two