This is why you shouldn't have any alcohol before getting the COVID vaccine

COVID-19 vaccinations are in full swing, promising a streak of hope on the horizon. But drinking alcohol is rumored to make the vaccine ineffective.

This is why you shouldn't have any alcohol before getting the COVID vaccine
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More and more people worldwide have already received their first Coronavirus vaccination. However, in order for the vaccine to generate immunity in the body, all people who want to be vaccinated should abstain from alcohol—otherwise the effect of the vaccine is put at risk, as a Russian researcher warns in the magazine New Scientist.

Scientist warns against drinking alcohol after vaccination

'We strongly recommend abstaining from alcohol for three days after each injection,' says Dr Alexander Gintsburg, head of the Gamaleya National Centre for Epidemiology and Microbiology in Moscow.

It is important to understand that excessive alcohol consumption can significantly reduce immunity and thus reduce the effectiveness of the vaccination or even make it pointless.

This is especially important in this situation because some people like to drink themselves up with a beer to wash away the arm pain. Beer is also considered to be a reliable painkiller that is said to work even better than paracetamol.

Antibodies are suppressed

However, according to the Russian scientist, alcoholic drinks could 'suppress the antibodies.' Just 120 grams of pure alcohol would be sufficient for this.

In general, it is important not to drink alcohol after every vaccination. However, Gintsburg also emphasises that he is not calling for a general ban on alcohol:

Of course, we are not talking about a complete ban on alcohol during vaccination. We are only talking about a reasonable restriction of consumption until the body has formed its own immune response to the coronavirus infection.

The WHO has already emphasised that alcohol can damage the immune system. A Swedish study from 2012 has also already proven that small amounts of alcohol can inhibit the immune response in a vaccination against pneumonia. However, unlike with the COVID vaccines, alcohol is not supposed to influence immunity in this particular case.