Man still lives in lockdown out of fear of losing his senses to Covid

The whisky expert lives in a self-imposed lockdown, as losing his sense of taste and smell to Covid could affect his job.

Man still lives in lockdown out of fear of losing his senses to Covid
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A leading whisky connoisseur is yet to come out of lockdown due to fears he might lose his source of livelihood to Covid. He has been sheltering in place since February 2020, before the first lockdown was announced in the UK.

More Than A Job

Blair Bowman, used to travel the world pre-COVID, but now only allows himself to step out of his Edinburgh home - which he shares with his partner - for walks and grocery shopping. He’s moved his business online now and said he could not be happier.

As a whisky expert, Bowman, 31, the loss of the ability to smell and taste could is a risk he is not willing to take.

For me the loss of sense of taste and smell was so important and quite a hard-hitting thing that made me decide to be more cautious. About 40 per cent of how we experience the world is taste and smell, I'd really miss being able to taste a nice coffee. It's less about my job and more about how I'd enjoy life

The whisky consultant and broker has been closely following the science since the start of the pandemic.

And he was aware from an early stage that loss of smell and taste was a symptom of the virus, informing his decision to shelter in place well before the first lockdown came into force across the UK.

'I Look Forward To Going Back'

He did step out a few times last summer for coffees and to meet people at a distance. That was when COVID was at its lowest levels. He has since gone back to staying in as more infections are recorded.

I have made this decision and I have come to peace with that. I am doing the right thing for myself and others. There is still a risk, despite being double vaccinated. We can still spread this virus amongst each other.

Although he may not be travelling and meeting people as regularly as he used to, Bowman is able to do his business online, speaking with people and writing about whisky.

Obviously I enjoyed it and I look forward to going back to it eventually when I feel comfortable to do so but in one week, I can talk to clients in Japan, India, Europe and the USA and not have to leave my living room. I probably speak to about 20 people every day on average, so it's not like I'm actually that shut off.