Deadly Species Of Sting Ray Spotted On British Shores Following Summer Heatwave
Deadly Species Of Sting Ray Spotted On British Shores Following Summer Heatwave
Deadly Species Of Sting Ray Spotted On British Shores Following Summer Heatwave
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Deadly Species Of Sting Ray Spotted On British Shores Following Summer Heatwave

By Abbie Marshall
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A fever of deadly stingrays has been spotted on British shores due to the recent summer heatwave that’s struck the whole of the UK. According to experts, the rise in the temperature has attracted the sea animal to our shores and they’re now warning people against swimming in the sea.

We all know that stingrays aren’t the safest of animals to be around at the best of times, so if you’re planning on having a summer holiday by the beach any time soon you may want to reconsider. A group of deadly stingrays has been spotted off the coast of jersey, presenting an imminent threat to the lives of British beach-goers.

Given the tragic circumstances back in 2006, surrounding the death of famous crocodile hunter and animal enthusiast, Steve Irwin, stingrays are certainly no force to be reckoned with. Marine biologists have warned British people to look out for the creatures after sightings were confirmed last week. According to the Daily Mail, one witness described that he saw people frantically getting out of the water “like a scene from Jaws’.

According to scientists, when the weather is warm and stays warm for an extended period of time, animals such as stingrays move out of their natural habitat of the deep oceans and move to more shallower parts of the sea. These stingrays have barbs containing venom along their tails which they use as a defence mechanism. Experts say that on average, sting rays measure under three feet long with a barb of just under 5 inches long.

So if you’re planning on going to the beach any time soon, be careful in the water and be on the lookout for these deadly creatures.


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